Privacy Legal

SUBMISSIONS
·  Can anyone submit a story?
·  I don't think I have much of a story. What should I do?
·  What if I went with someone of the opposite sex?
·  Are stories anonymous?
·  Can I edit my submission?
·  Do all submissions automatically appear on this site?
·  Are there other reasons you would edit something out?

PHOTOS
·  What if I want to add a photo after I've submitted a story?
·  What are the best specs/formats for photos?
·  I've got an old print photo. How can I put it on the site?
·  My image is too large. What should I do?

GETTING INVOLVED
·  What should I do if I want to be in the book?
·  How can I help?
·  How do I join the mailing list?
·  Why should I join the mailing list?
·  What do you do with the email addresses?

BACKGROUND INFO
·  How did this project come about?
·  What's the point?
·  Bonus Trivia: When did prom start?

ABOUT US
·  What's the deal with the book?
·  Who's involved in the book?
·  Who created this site?

 

SUBMISSIONS

Can anyone submit a story?
Yes and no. The site is a collection of prom stories from gay, bi, and trans men and women of all ages. That said, if you went to the prom with someone who is (or was) LGBLT then we'd love to hear your story, too.

Of course, everyone is invited to read the stories. And hopefully, you'll find them intriguing, revealing, educational or, at the very least, entertaining

I don't think I have much of a story. What should I do?
Most people think they don't have a story. But trust us, they always do. Take a minute to think back to prom night. Picture the decorations, the outfits, the dancing. What do you remember? Can you remember the name of your date? (What ever happened to him or her?) Were there any funny, sexy, awkward moments? Go ahead, add your story. Write whatever you want about your high school prom. There's no right or wrong story. And you never know what somebody else might find interesting. Especially if they went to school in a different part of the country or at a different time.

What if I went with someone of the opposite sex?
Can I still submit my story?

YES! That's a big part of the story. Most people didn't have the option of going with a same-sex date. So, please tell your story…

Are stories anonymous?
Yes. But if you include a photo and you haven't changed much since prom, don't be surprised if some of your old friends recognize you. And, what's wrong with that?

Can I edit my submission?
Once you've submitted your story, if you have any changes you "simply must make," send them to edit@gayprom.com and we'll be happy to change your story for you. Given our limited resources, it my take a few days, but we'll do it as quickly as possible.

Do all submissions automatically appear on this site?
No. We receive some submissions that we have to cut because they, unfortunately, are not about prom or not about LGBT folk. Also, we do our best to screen for slurs, hateful language, judgements and rants. This site is about your stories. And we do our best to keep it that way.

Are there other reasons you would edit something out?
Yes. Last names, phone numbers, email addresses, urls and the such are not permitted. Even though users are responsible for the content of the posting, we'll do our best to edit these things out. Also people engaging in aggravating behavior such as, but not limited to, posting the same submission more than once (and in more than one decade) will find that their contributions are not on display.

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PHOTOS

What if I want to add a photo after I've submitted a story?
Feel free to email the image to photo@gayprom.com. To help us match your image to your story, please include the first several words of your story, as well as your gender and class year. Photos will be added as quickly as we can.

What are the best specs/formats for photos?
JPEGs and GIFs are preferred. Try to keep the width and height to 4 inches or less. Also, file size should not exceed 25K.

I've got an old print photo. How can I put it on the site?
First, you need to scan it. Which you can do at Kinko's or places like that if you don't have access at home or work. When you do scan it, make sure you set the resolution to 72 pixels per inch. And, if the photo is in color, scan it in color.

Both the height and width of the image should be between 50and 350 pixels each (approximately .75 inch and 4.75 inches). Images should be saved in .jpeg, .gif or .png formats. The image file cannot exceed 150 K in memory. If it does, make the image smaller by decreasing the width and height or pixels per inch.

If you're having a difficult time figure all of this photo stuff out, just send the digital file to photo@gayprom.com. If you have no access to a scanner and want to include it on the site, email us and let us know. We'll try to help you out if we can.

My image is too large. What should I do?
Both the height and width of the image should be between 50and 350 pixels each (approximately .75 inch and 4.75 inches).

If you get an error message that says the image is too big, there are a few things you can do: - decrease the width and height of the image - decrease the number of pixels per inch; the web standard is 72 pixels per inch

When you're done, make sure you save the file in the jpeg, .gif or .png format.

If you're having a difficult time creating the image, just send us a digital file at photo@gayprom.com. If you have no access to a scanner and want to include it, email us and let us know; we'll try to help you out if we can.

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GETTING INVOLVED

What should I do if I want to be in the book?
Feel free to email us at book@gayprom.com. Or, before you submit your story, mark the "consider me for the book" box in the "Requests" section. We'll contact you ASAP.

Keep in mind, everyone featured in the book must have a prom photo available and be willing to have that picture published.

How can I help?
Here's a few ways:
· Add a story
· Join the mailing list
· Tell a friend
· Attend an event.

How do I join the mailing list?
Click here. Or fill in your email address in the MAILING LIST area at the bottom left of each page.

Why should I join the mailing list?
From time to time, we'll have events--including readings and fundraisers--in cities across the country. If you're on the mailing list, we'll keep you in the loop. Otherwise, check the homepage periodically for the latest news about the site, the book and who knows what else.

What do you do with the email addresses? Do you sell them?
We do not sell information about you to anyone or any organization for any reason whatsoever. If you provide it, your email address will be used exclusively for activities related to this project, including periodic announcements and information about the upcoming book.

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BACKGROUND INFO

How did this project come about?
This all started in June of 1989 when David Boyer went to his prom in a suburb of NYC. It was that night that he realized, once and for all, that he wasn't destined for heterosexuality. A few years later, after graduating college and coming out, he interviewed other gays about prom night for MIGHT magazine. The rest is history. And if you submit a story or are interviewed for the book, you will become a part of it.

What's the point?
First of all, it's about more than prom. That's just where it begins. Hopefully, together these stories will create an anecdotal gay history for teens, gays of all ages and people in general. Since gay history is not part of the school curriculum, many of us are unaware of the prominent gays that pre-date Ellen DeGeneres. This may fill in some of the gaps and suggest how growing up gay-and by extension, being gay-has and has not changed over the years. For friends and relatives of gays, it may be a chance to better understand what it feels like to grow up gay and how that impacts, in both obvious and subtle ways, one's life.

Bonus Trivia:
When/how did prom start?

Prom is one of the few rituals shared by teens of different generations and geographies, races and classes, genders and sexualities. Proms began popping up in school gyms at the turn of the last century and reached critical mass in the 1930s as more and more teens entered the public school system. From their inception, proms represented a debutante ball for the masses, a coming-out party to mark the end of high school and the transition from adolescence to adulthood.

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ABOUT US

What's up with the book?
Soft Skull Press will be publishing a coffee-table book, titled KINGS & QUEENS: Queers at the Prom, in Spring 2004. Soft Skull is a funky, progressive, independent, Brooklyn-based company. And we love them!

Who's involved in the book?
David Boyer (a.k.a. IDEAMAN!) is the author/editor of the upcoming book.

Martin Venezky (of Appetite Engineers) will be designing the book. And many of his early design thoughts have been incorporated into this site.

And, of course the site is really the handiwork of all of the people who have jogged their memories and shared their stories.

Who created this site?
David Boyer (a.k.a. IDEAMAN!) is the editor/designer of this site. In designing this site, David borrowed liberally from Martin Venezky's early book-design sketches.

Ted Rheingold (of One Match Fire) is the SF-based web-developer/wizard whose right-on firm brought this site to life. He has brought lyricism and thoughtfulness to the web with Mindful In The Storm and Fleeting Image.

Once again, the people who have shared their stories and photos are the real stars of the site. A big thanks from all of us to all of you.